The Make Up Makes it: 9 Make Up Based Costume Transformations

[bs_slideshow]

 

Tonight’s the night we’ve been waiting for! Time to see those spooky & adorable costumes: ghouls, monsters, cats, and characters, I can’t wait! If you’re looking for some last minute inspiration, here’s a list of 9 awesome makeup transformations and great costume ideas. Happy Halloween, everyone!


Be The Centaur Of Attention This Halloween

One of the things I enjoy the most is finding creative uses for ordinary things. Rather than looking at something and asking “What is this supposed to be used for?”, I’d rather ask “What COULD this be used for?”

About a year ago I got a tandem bicycle. While I certainly enjoyed riding around with my wife or a friend, I also started thinking “How else could I use this?”

Then one day, it hit me. I decided that instead of a bicycle built for two two-legged creatures, I would make a bicycle built for one four-legged creature.

Thus, the centaur bike.

I realize that most people are not going to go out and build one of these, but hopefully this video makes you laugh and gives you a little insight into my process. Who knows? Maybe it’ll even inspire you to find a creative new use for something in your own life!


10 Impressively Huge Halloween Costumes

Inside this awesome Diablo costume sits the talented designer Krizdel Ingreso.

Inside this awesome Diablo costume sits the talented designer Krizdel Ingreso.

It’s that time of year again when kids and adults alike don their costumes to celebrate Halloween. While store-bought costumes are great in their own right, it’s the giant, detailed costumes garner the most attention. As the saying goes’ go big or go home’ and the costumes in this roundup certainly prove that sometimes bigger is better.

Besides being large, these costumes are unique in their own right with their creators putting their own spin on the strange and unusual. From big digital heads to intricate monster designs are featured in all of their DIY glory. Nothing was purchased from a specialty costume store but rather handcrafted in spooky detail. Click the links to get for more information on these as well as others made from some of the talented artists below.

Dan Rosenfeld’s Big Head project displays his face on a 24-inch LCD in real-time.

Dan Rosenfeld’s Big Head project displays his face on a 24-inch LCD in real-time.

 

Halloween without Aprilyn P’s Zombie Lego Mini Figurine just wouldn’t be same.

Halloween without Aprilyn P’s Zombie Lego Mini Figurine just wouldn’t be same.

 

Stan Winston School of Character Art collaborated with Wired to create this Giant Robot Mech.

Stan Winston School of Character Art collaborated with Wired to create this Giant Robot Mech.

 

Kre8 FX’s giant Halo Elite costume is powered by the wearer as well as animatronics.

Kre8 FX’s giant Halo Elite costume is powered by the wearer as well as animatronics.

 

These butterfly costumes were actually created for a live-action tale by Zina Brown.

These butterfly costumes were actually created for a live-action tale by Zina Brown.

 

Jason Smith’s Aliens Power Loader Baby Costume is actually powered by Dad.

Jason Smith’s Aliens Power Loader Baby Costume is actually powered by Dad.

 

Reko Rivera and John Savio’s Working iPhone Costumes use a 42-inch display powered by the iPhone.

Reko Rivera and John Savio’s Working iPhone Costumes use a 42-inch display powered by the iPhone.

 

Danielle Beaulieu and Nick Poulos’ Rideable Arcade Hecarim from League of Legends.

Danielle Beaulieu and Nick Poulos’ Rideable Arcade Hecarim from League of Legends.

 

Roofletch’s Keeper of the Graveyard costume stands over 8-feet tall and is made of chicken wire and old phone bills.

Roofletch’s Keeper of the Graveyard costume stands over 8-feet tall and is made of chicken wire and old phone bills.

 

 


20 Awesome Ideas For Your Jack-O-Lantern

[bs_slideshow] Tonight is my personal favorite night of the Halloween season: the night I carve the pumpkins! Ever since I was a little kid, I couldn’t wait for the night I got to carve pumpkins with my family. Picking out your perfect pumpkin, deciding upon your perfect design, and then drawing it on before you start carving in is just such great fun. Not to mention all the fun of pulling out the guts! Then baking pumpkin seeds, (yum!) and finally, the delightful satisfaction of seeing it perfectly candlelit under a night sky. If you’re still looking for ideas for your perfect carving, here’s a collection of some awesome jack-o’-lanterns to inspire you!


The Making Of An Animatronic Alien

final_alien_high_quality

This horrifying Xenomorph homage to H.R. Giger—in particular, his indelible influence on the aesthetic of the Alien film universe—was created by Eva Taylor, a student of dramatic art (properties) at the National Institute of Dramatic Art in Sydney, Australia. The hybrid animatronic-rod puppet draws its inspiration from the “bambi burster” (so dubbed by director David Fincher for newborn creature’s wobbly legs) designed and fabricated for the film Alien 3.

Taylor’s work incorporates a variety of materials and techniques: the torso and limbs are hand-carved from Queensland maple; the limb joints are made from harvested and modified RC car and helicopter parts; the skull is cast from fiberglass and houses two actuators (one for the jaw and one for the tongue) and one servo (for the lips); and the tail contains custom laser-cut acrylic segments for an 8-way, 2-stage tentacle mechanism. Finally, the creature’s body was coated in silicone and specialized muscle groups created in deadened, encapsulated silicone and airbrushed with Skin Illustrator pigments for a flayed look.

The body, limbs, and pan and tilt of the head of the puppet are controlled by rods. The animatronic components of the jaw, tongue, and lips are controlled by two PlayStation 3 controllers using the ServoShock module on an Arduino. And the tail is controlled by mechanical means.

Taylor’s husband, David, filmed the making-of video highlighting a few aspects of the fabrication and directed a screen-test of what the creature would look like in a more dramatic piece.

 

Details of the build are excerpted, with permission, from Taylor’s research dissertation, “Puppetry in the Alien Film Universe — The Adaptation of H.R Giger’s Biomechanical Surrealism and a Reimagining of an Alien Rod Puppet.” All photos courtesy David Taylor.

Torso, limbs, & joints

initial bone carving

Ten bones and four feet/paws needed to be carved in addition to the major torso. I dimensioned the stock using a planer before rough cutting all timber using a bandsaw and then moving to chisels to create the final shape. A dremel with a sanding bit proved useful for the final shaping.

The torso proved to be the most challenging aspect, which was expected prior to commencement. It also took the most amount of time. Certain aspects needed more finishing, such as the depth of the trenches between the ribs in order for the ribs to stand out. The sockets for each of the ball joints also had to be accurately carved.

clevis joint in situ

I ended up discovering very cheap aluminium parts on eBay, made in China for RC cars and planes. These parts included items such as “steering linkages” and “wheel assemblies” which I realised I could repurpose as a type of very small clevis joint.

Head, jaw, & tongue

underskull casting

The original intent was for a fibreglass mould to be utilised for a resin underskull cast. While an underskull would have always been a necessity – the animatronic functions demand the space – it became apparent that the fibreglass mould could itself be used as an underskull foregoing the need for any additional resin casting.

tongue/secondary mouth

My choice for jaw material was hard, clear resin. Starting with clay, I modelled the teeth directly onto the underskull and jaw. After this, I took a silicone mould of the clay. Into the silicone I poured dental acrylic and after this set I used a soft dental acrylic to create the gums. Due to the tight spaces within the jaw, the tongue/secondary mouth was one of the last components to be fabricated. The [resin] cast tongue slotted in to the actuator arm and was fixed with a small screw to prevent it from detaching. Trial and error was used to achieve the correct positioning in the mouth.

Tentacle tail mechanism

The skeleton of the tail consists, as mentioned above, of custom laser-cut acrylic parts. These parts include segments of vertebra in decreasing diameter and small extrusions. The vertebra have holes for 8 wires (in the case of the first 5 vertebra) and 4 wires (in the case of the last 5). Crucially, all vertebra segments have a hole in the centre for the “spine” to pass through. The “spine” was made out of car speedo cable that was salvaged for a spare parts yard. A speedo cable, as I discovered in the Stan Winston tutorial, is “counter-wound” meaning that it cannot twist on itself (which creates very unrealistic movement).

Musculature & skin

Entirely coincidently, I stumbled upon a (successful) Kickstarter campaign for a short film titled He Took His Skin off For Me. This film consisted of a practical effect whereby the main character literally shed his skin, leaving the muscle groups exposed. Conveniently, the film’s makers also posted to their website a short tutorial on the techniques used to obtain this effect. I set about creating all the necessary muscle groups from clay, using reference images from canine anatomy. The clay was then used to create silicone moulds.  


Alien Queen Costume

7alien-queen

Animation director and self-proclaimed “Queen of monsters” Ashley J Long wanted to make something that could be used for Halloween and Comic Con. The queen alien from Aliens 2 would fit the bill as something that is scary and a huge part of geek culture. After all, according to her it can “dislodge a human head from its spine in under 5 seconds.” Being gooey in the movie doesn’t hurt the creepiness factor either.

The headpiece is the thing that most stands out and was the most work for this project. It’s made out of 50-60 sheets of card stock which were cut and glued over a 2 month period (geeks must always remember to plan early for Halloween). The in-process headpiece was braced with drinking straw, then coated with Bondo boat resin and painted. Various jewels were also added for effect.

A bike helmet was then squeezed into a place that seemed to be the most balanced, then locked in place with adhesive and clay. You can see some of the process and finished pictures in the gallery below.

[new_gallery type=”slideshow” size=”medium” ids=”451401,451402,451403,451404,451405,451409,451406,451407″]

Naturally there’s also a black outfit that goes along with it, as well as a spine piece and egg. The spine was made of flexible aluminum conduit with sheet foam for the vertebrae, while the egg is made out of paper mache. Apparently it’s filled with green slime, so don’t stick your hand in there!


25 Perfect Things to 3D Print for Halloween

[bs_slideshow]

Halloween is fast approaching, and if you’re not printing you’d better get started! Here are 25 gruesome and great things to print for this Halloween. Some items you can wear, some items are just perfect for placing around your house to set the spooky mood. Put that 3D printer to work and be sure to shoot us pictures @make on twitter! 


Stick Figure LED Light Costume

stick-man-costume

Looking for a great last-minute Halloween costume for you or your kids? If you just happen to have a strip of LEDs available, attaching them to a black hoodie and pants in a stick figure configuration as “Visual Burrito” did might be an option.

He originally constructed one of these suits for his daughter Zoey, but the tutorial below shows the general layout of this costume for an adult. If you have any experience with electronics, building one shouldn’t be extremely complicated. Attach strips for the torso and arms to the hoodie, then bend one into a circle to attach to the actual hood. Two more strips will be attached to the pants, and all are connected so that only only one power source has to be used.

The tutorial below shows how it’s made, or you can skip to 8:47 to see it in action.

The video’s build shows a single-colored LED strip being used, which should simplify things. Obviously this will limit your lighting options versus an RGB strip. If you want to get even simpler, you can just buy one of these costumes, but given that you’re reading Make’s blog, you might not find that quite as interesting.

Another option would be to make something similar using EL wire (which we happen to sell in our Maker Shed) or strips, or you could even mock something up with glow sticks.


Halloween Pirate Shipwreck Yard Display

Halloween-Pirate-Shipwreck-display-1

Well, this incredible Halloween yard display, featuring a full-sized pirate ghost ship that seems to have collided with a house in Lorain, Ohio, certainly makes my timbers shiver. This impressive spectacle is the work of brothers Ricky and Tony Rodriguez, despite the apprehension of their mother, whose house they’ve magnificently transformed into a backdrop for the reveling of the pirate ship’s skeleton crew.

halloween-pirate-shipwreck-display-2

I love how seamlessly their elaborate display is incorporated into the house, it’s done so well that you can almost see it crashing through the house before your very eyes!


Kid Dresses Up as a Vending Machine and Other Inanimate Objects Every Year for Halloween

vending-machine-costume-1

Redditor MoobyTheGoldenCalf appears to have turned the dynamics of the typical trick-or-treater to candy-giver relationship upside down with this ingenious vending machine costume that he made for his son this year. Although it doesn’t actually dispense snacks, there is something wonderfully poetic about the notion of depositing candy into a walking vending machine!

The front has a plastic/plexiglass sheet so that kids don’t run up to him and steal the chips. The slot on the right is the candy deposit slot, so the candy goes down a chute into the “push” bin section at the bottom. The inside of it has a piece of mirror film on the back of the chip area, so that he can see out, but people can’t see him. And the thing lights up too, which is probably a good idea as it’s just a black box from the back.

vending-machine-costume-2

The vending machine costume is not the first time that MoobyTheGoldenCalf made his son a clever costume based on an inanimate object. Last year his son dress up as a fantastically functional mailbox, which also accepted candy deposits!

vending-machine-costume-3

Other costumes from previous years include a traffic light (with a pedestrian crossing candy bucket!), a recycling bin, and a traffic cone. Not only am I seeing a distinct theme of objects controlled by municipal authorities here, I’m also seeing the development of an amazing collaborative relationship in which MoobyTheGoldenCalf gets to exercise a tremendous amount of creative ingenuity in response to his son’s unorthodox requests. I’d say Kudos, but in this case it looks like Cheetos might be more appropriate.

vending-machine-costume-4

vending-machine-costume-5

[via Technabob]